Author Elliott Gillespie

Taking on the Next-Gen Digital World

EDC has financial relationships with many multinationals, both in Canada and abroad, that can influence international supply and partnership opportunities for our small and established exporters.

Today, there are roughly three billion connections to the Internet. By 2020, these connections will grow to over 50 billion. They will not be driven by people, but by devices — an Internet of things or machine-to-machine (M2M) communication. By 2020, ultra-high capacity networks will store, transmit and analyze billions of data points, created every second, by the billions of people and devices that will cover the planet.

Canada is currently home to the major multinationals that supply the world’s telecom giants with the infrastructure of these high capacity networks — such as Ericsson, Alcatel-Lucent, Nokia Siemens Networks and Ciena. They in turn leverage Canada’s R&D capabilities and our robust telecom ecosystem.

How will Canadian companies continue to stake their claim in this new digital economy? In the future, new industrial applications, business models and analytical technologies — which ubiquitous high-speed connectivity requires — is where the next wave of technological innovation will be created, one that could bring Canadian expertise to the forefront of the oncoming global ICT opportunities.

As connectivity and mobile forms evolve in all key industries, in conjunction with cloud architectures and exploding machine-to-machine traffic, the opportunity to create enterprise-grade applications that leverage all these factors is immense. Key growth areas include: intelligent infrastructure that combines sensors, network connectivity and software to monitor and analyze everything from transportation to oil and gas systems; geomatics for resource development; precision farming, which integrates wireless connectivity and satellite images to maximize agricultural production; advanced security applications and more.

Many of these cross-sector applications have already been commercialized and are being exported, led by some of EDC’s Canadian ICT clients. For instance, Redline Communications of Ontario is creating a wireless infrastructure system for a major oil field operated by an Abu Dhabi company (UAE). Through the project’s system integrator Alcatel-Lucent, Redline is supplying an integrated digital oil field system to provide reliable real-time communications between the wellhead sensors and control centre — where the operation can be monitored and controlled remotely.

This is just one of many cases where innovative Canadian ICT players are creating applications that are helping shape tomorrow’s digital landscape. To increase the export potential of these technologies, EDC is using our domestic and international relationships in strong Canadian sectors — such as, infrastructure, transportation, oil and gas, mining, agriculture and power generation — to connect our small and medium-sized ICT companies to key foreign buyers. The adoption of innovative ICT niche applications by larger Canadian firms (non-ICT) has the potential to make both parties more competitive globally.

EDC has financial relationships with many multinationals, both in Canada and abroad, that can influence international supply and partnership opportunities for our small and established exporters. This approach, along with our wide range of credit insurance and financing for international deals, can help qualified Canadian companies bring next generation technologies to global markets – and do it faster than others in this rapidly evolving digital space.

Comment below to let me know what your company is doing to shape the future digital economy.

Categories Industry Insights, Technology & Telecom

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